Advanced theory test question

I passed my advanced theory test for driving at Bukit Batok Driving Centre. I got all questions right.

Question, what do you do when placed in a situation where there is an old man still crossing the road after the green man has turned red?

Options:

  1. Sound your horn at the pedestrian to hurry him.
  2. Rev your engine at the pedestrian to hurry him.
  3. Be patient and wait till he finished crossing the road.

My favorite question.

Proving Fermat’s Last Theorem

Fermat’s last theorem is strikingly different and much more difficult to prove than the analogous problem for n = 2… The fact that the problem’s statement is understandable by schoolchildren makes it all the more frustrating, and it has probably generated more incorrect proofs than any other problem in the history of mathematics. No correct proof was found for 357 years, when a proof was finally published by Andrew Wiles in 1994. The term “last theorem” resulted because all the other theorems proposed by Fermat were eventually proved or disproved, either by his own proofs or by other mathematicians, in the two centuries following their proposition.”

Fermat claims to have proven it in his letter:

Cubum autem in duos cubos, aut quadratoquadratum in duos quadratoquadratos, et generaliter nullam in infinitum ultra quadratum potestatem in duos eiusdem nominis fas est dividere cuius rei demonstrationem mirabilem sane detexi. Hanc marginis exiguitas non caperet.

Translated:

I have discovered a truly marvelous proof that it is impossible to separate a cube into two cubes, or a fourth power into two fourth powers, or in general, any power higher than the second into two like powers. This margin is too narrow to contain it.

Right. Andrew Wiles has successfully proven the last theorem with techniques not made available to Fermat during his time. Fermat’s proof probably never existed.

Fermat’s Last Theorem Part 1

Continue reading “Proving Fermat’s Last Theorem”

How optical illusion works

Beau Lotto’s color games puzzle your vision, but they also spotlight what you can’t normally see: how your brain works. This fun, first-hand look at your own versatile sense of sight reveals how evolution tints your perception of what’s really out there.

Beau Lotto is founder of Lottolab, a hybrid art studio and science lab. With glowing, interactive sculpture — and good, old-fashioned peer-reviewed research — he’s illuminating the mysteries of the brain’s visual system.

Beau Lotto: Optical illusions show how we see

Yay! Pass my final theory

I wasn’t really confident before the test with my falling eye lids and my sucky memory. The questions turned out to be easier than I thought.

The rules are:

  • Be super nicey to pedestrians and your driving peers
  • Horn? We love our neighbors. If there is an option that says you supposed to wind down your window and greet your driving peers – that probably is the correct answer.
  • No reckless driving
  • If the question is about punishment and you didn’t study, choose the maximum, it’s more likely right than wrong.
  • Left is the right answer. Keep left in Singapore

More questions are rather common sense, it’s not hard to pick the answer that looked most right.

One down. Now it’s all the practical stuff which is a lot harder than I thought. It’s even harder when the instructor starts talking to you and you try to process what he says without crashing into a tree. It’s high level coordination you know.

Passed the final theory evaluation

Been a little busy this couple of days with work, theory test, PC show and a little something.

I passed my final theory evaluation. Went for a practice on Thursday and Friday and took the evaluation today. I was feeling kinda panicky this morning when I woke at ten and didn’t have time to do much reading up.

When the results got revealed. I see that I got 45 of 50 questions right. That translate to a 90% which is just pass! I returned home happily and blasted some music.