On life being difficult

On life being difficult. From the book “The Road Less Traveled”:

“Life is difficult. This is a great truth, one of the greatest truths. It is a great truth because once we truly see this truth, we transcend it. Once we truly know that life is difficult-once we truly understand and accept it-then life is no longer difficult. Because once it is accepted, the fact that life is difficult no longer matters.”

― M. Scott Peck

I constantly remind myself this.

Think before you oppose an idea

“Our wretched species is so made that those who walk on the well-trodden path always throw stones at those who are showing a new road”

— Voltaire

Recount the times where you said someone’s idea was bad. Are those idea really bad or was it threatening your current way of doing things? Some ideas could lead to great outcomes if you hadn’t slam and discourage its owner.

The “honest and reasonable mistake”

Regarding the incident where Howard Shaw pleaded guilty to having paid sex with an underage girl, I like how the lawyer puts it:

His lawyer Mr Harpreet Singh argued that Shaw had made an “honest and reasonable mistake.” He said that there was “no pre-meditation nor intention” as the offence was committed “unwittingly”. Mr Singh called for a non-custodial sentence as Shaw’s case “falls at or very near, the lowest end of the culpability spectrum”.

The former Singapore Environment Council executive director was among 48 men who were earlier charged with paid sex with the 17-year-old.

Define your terms

What do you think of Voltaire’s quote?

“If you wish to converse with me, define your terms”

— Voltaire

My take is, yes, you should define the terms, it does help in the discussion. But it still doesn’t stop terms from being redefined in the middle of the discussion. Presumably, as discussion continues, in the long run, there should be sufficient consensus in the terms to both parties. However that is hardly in my case.

A strange mystery on nature

“A strange mystery it is that Nature, omnipotent but blind, in the revolutions of her secular hurryings through the abysses of space, has brought forth at last a child, subject still to her power, but gifted with sight, with knowledge of good and evil, with the capacity of judging all the works of his unthinking Mother.” — Bertrand Russell