Tag Archives: public relations

Rich man who has sex with daughter silences media

David Bruce McMahan is a philanthropist and financier who has supported initiatives to help the disabled internationally, the arts and land conservation. According to federal courthouse in Miami (via VillageVoice), he also has had an incestuous relationship with his daughter, Linda, who is now suing him.

Over the years, as a high-flying financial player at places like Bear Stearns and then later managing your own hedge fund, you had not only amassed a fortune, but you had reproduced prodigiously, having six children by three different women, and then marrying a fourth. Then, in 1990, there was that great shock: You learned about Linda. Gorgeous, talented, eager-to-meet-you and all-grown-up Linda.

His daughter Linda tells the seduction story in a video by she was almost finished with a PhD in psychology when she visited her father’s Westchester County estate. Linda claimed that her father David Bruce McMahan told her he believed they’d been married in a previous life and her legs were a “very sexy version” of his own.

The pair reportedly purchased matching diIdos and exchanged an email:

“I unpacked the toys and checked them out. The thing excites me just looking at it. I promise you have never seen anything like it. Interestingly ‘it’ is actually smaller than I am! But what moves! I should have been so lucky. They are now packed into their own bag and I am going to make sure we have enough AA batteries to last for the duration.” (Source: Village Voice)

Later in 2004 Linda testified her father wanted to cut Sargent Schutt, her legal husband, out of the picture. Bruce McMahan then brought his daughter to Westminster Abbey to exchange vows. Bruce McMahan was married at that time to Elena, his fifth wife who suspected him of incestuous behavior. So Bruce McMahan asked her daughter to file a sworn statement denying the incest. Linda refuses and multiple lawsuits were exchanged.

VillageVoice continues that David Bruce McMahan tried to silence the media and engaged a PR firm to clean up his Wikipedia page and even changed his name.

With just days to go before our story was to be published, you wrote checks for millions of dollars to settle all of the lawsuits and get them sealed from public view as quickly as you could. (You also hired an L.A. public relations firm in an attempt to intimidate us, and even tried to haul us into court to have legal materials pulled down from the website, but we don’t scare easy, bub.)

The New York Post, God bless ‘em, did put together a righteous write-up of its own, relying on our reporting, but then the Post had at least one reporter who knew all about you, and convinced editors there that you were every bit the scumbag our story made you out to be.

If the Times stayed silent, newspapers and magazines from Greece to Australia inundated us with requests for the Westminster Abbey photos and other documents.

(Looks like you’ve also changed your name, slightly. Born David Bruce McMahan, you went by D. Bruce McMahan until we wrote about you. Now you’re David B. McMahan, apparently.)

That couldn’t be more obvious seeing how much money you spent scrubbing Wikipedia. For months after our original story came out, you had your goons launch daily attacks at the website, using sock puppets and other methods to intimidate the online encyclopedia into removing any mention of what was in our stories. Today, there’s no page at all. As far as Wikipedia is concerned, you don’t even exist.

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Google explains why all sites may harm your computer

This is Google’s response for informing all their users that every site on this world wide web is harmful to their computer. “Very simply, human error,” they confessed. It’s a huge mistake and definitely shaken people’s confidence a little. But by being truthful about the whole incident without using the word “whoops” (like Dreamhost) is good PR still.

“This site may harm your computer” on every search result?!?!

What happened? Very simply, human error. Google flags search results with the message “This site may harm your computer” if the site is known to install malicious software in the background or otherwise surreptitiously. We do this to protect our users against visiting sites that could harm their computers. We maintain a list of such sites through both manual and automated methods. We work with a non-profit called StopBadware.org to come up with criteria for maintaining this list, and to provide simple processes for webmasters to remove their site from the list.

We periodically update that list and released one such update to the site this morning. Unfortunately (and here’s the human error), the URL of ‘/’ was mistakenly checked in as a value to the file and ‘/’ expands to all URLs. Fortunately, our on-call site reliability team found the problem quickly and reverted the file. Since we push these updates in a staggered and rolling fashion, the errors began appearing between 6:27 a.m. and 6:40 a.m. and began disappearing between 7:10 and 7:25 a.m., so the duration of the problem for any particular user was approximately 40 minutes. (Source: Google Blog)

I was a little troubled yesterday and had to use Yahoo for searches but I wasn’t too concern. Here’s StopBadware’s side of the story.