Oracle shuts down open source test servers

Oracle shuts down open source test servers that PostgreSQL uses to test their builds. PostgreSQL is competing with Oracle’s MySQL and Oracle Database.

Oracle shuts down open source test servers

Like most open source platforms, PostgreSQL relies on an army of distributed volunteers. It is volunteers that, for example, operate the PostgreSQL Build farm, a “distributed, automated build and verify system” built by enthusiast Andrew Dunstan.

Oracle has shut down servers Sun Microsystems was contributing to the build farm for open source database software, PostgreSQL, forcing enthusiasts to scramble to find new hosts to test updates to their software on the Solaris operating system.

“It’s a vital piece of the infrastructure for developing PostgreSQL,” Dunstan told iTnews. “Before it existed, if some change we made broke on some platform, it was often weeks or months before we found out about it. Now we know within hours.”

At the start of July, Oracle shut down its three PostgreSQL build farm servers without warning, leaving the PostgreSQL community rushing to find replacements.

Dunstan said he “suspects” Oracle does view PostgreSQL as a competitor. (Source: IT News)

I love to see Oracle post their financial results, they have made quite a bit of cost cutting moves since the acquisition. You can hardly blame them too; they’ve got shareholders to report to. After all, doing too much charity work on open source is partly why Sun Microsystems failed in the first place.

Cloud computing? What the hell is that?

Larry Ellison expresses his opinions on cloud computing. He probably hates the way the word is flaunt around as a medicine that would cure all your computing troubles.

Why Larry Ellison hates Cloud computing

There isn’t a consensus what cloud is and is not. We just go on assuming that it is something like this, something like that. Cloud computing — it’s there because SaaS and Web 2.0 sounds old.

Oracle trying to make money with Java

This is a good move perhaps, one of the new features of Java 1.6 Update 14 is:

Garbage First (G1) Garbage Collector

Garbage First, or G1, is a low pause, server style collector. G1’s primary advantages over the Concurrent Mark-Sweep (CMS) collector include incremental compaction, better predictability and ease of use.

Although G1 is available for use in this release, note that production use of G1 is only permitted where a Java support contract has been purchased. G1 is supported thru Sun’s Java Platform Standard Edition for Business program. Source: Sun

I got really tired of Java updates. I realized it never just updates to the latest, instead it keeps all the old ones which I see no need for.

Oracle, not IBM, will acquire Sun

With the new buy Oracle will own MySQL! Well, that’s really nothing compared to Oracle’s own database. But Oracle will now own Java too. Not that I care of course.

Oracle Buys Sun

Oracle Corporation (Nasdaq: ORCL) and Sun Microsystems (Nasdaq: JAVA) announced today they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Oracle will acquire Sun common stock for $9.50 per share in cash. The transaction is valued at approximately $7.4 billion, or $5.6 billion net of Sun’s cash and debt. “We expect this acquisition to be accretive to Oracle’s earnings by at least 15 cents on a non-GAAP basis in the first full year after closing. We estimate that the acquired business will contribute over $1.5 billion to Oracle’s non-GAAP operating profit in the first year, increasing to over $2 billion in the second year. This would make the Sun acquisition more profitable in per share contribution in the first year than we had planned for the acquisitions of BEA, PeopleSoft and Siebel combined,” said Oracle President Safra Catz.

So long as IBM is not the one buying it. It’s good to see Oracle moving into open source though. Oracle hasn’t been that embracing to the open source community. Perhaps the acquisition would change things.

[via Ridzuan through MSN]

Federal judge found Justice Department hadn’t prove case

A piece of really old news but I thought the following paragraph’s a little funny.

Beginning in 2003, PeopleSoft battled with Oracle over control of the PeopleSoft company. In June 2003, Oracle made a $7 billion bid ($19.50/share) in a hostile corporate takeover attempt. In February 2004, Oracle increased their bid to approximately $9.4 billion ($26/share), a 33% increase; this offer was also rejected forthwith by PeopleSoft’s board of directors. Later that month, the U.S. Department of Justice filed suit to block Oracle, on the grounds that the acquisition would break anti-trust laws; however, in September 2004, the suit was rejected by a U.S. Federal judge, who found that the Justice Department had not proven its anti-trust case; in October, the same decision was handed down by the European Commission. (Source: Wikipedia)