Microsoft Office 2013 at $99.99/year

Microsoft prices Office 2013 at $99.99 — a year. That’s quite reasonable for me.

Microsoft debuts Office 2013, a modern reimagining of Word, Excel, & more with subscription

People can choose to pay $99.99 a year for a single subscription that covers up to five users or devices, an extra 20 GB of SkyDrive cloud storage (on top of the free 7 GB of space), 60 minutes of Skype calls per month, and premium licenses that ensure households get as-they-happen software updates.

Folks can instead opt for the nonfrills, single person Office Home and Student 2013 package that costs $139.99. But this has a bunch of catches. With the one-time price option, you won’t get software updates, the additional SkyDrive space, those handy Skype calling minutes, or Outlook, Access, and Publisher. If you want Outlook, you’ll need the pricier Office Home and Business 2013 version, which costs $219.99. Source: VentureBeat

With Adobe also doing the subscription model, I am convinced this is going to be the common model in future.

Microsoft.com’s upcoming design

This is the soon-to-be new design of Microsoft.com

View the new design.

Remarkable improvement over the current. I often wonder what the good people at Microsoft are doing with such a terrible front page.

What’s impressive here is its adaptive design. Try resizing your browser window and watch the components size themselves appropriately. It’s not an easy feat.

One complaint though, the site looks too sharp.

Microsoft proposes S&M

Just learnt about Microsoft’s S&M proposal. Horrible naming — almost like dark humour for journalists.

S&M vs. SPDY: Microsoft and Google battle over the future of HTTP 2.0

Lumbered with the truly awful name of HTTP Speed+Mobility, or HTTP S&M for short, Microsoft’s vision of HTTP 2.0 is mostly very similar to SPDY (and it admits as much on the Microsoft Interoperability blog), but with additional features that cater towards apps and mobile devices. “The HTTP Speed+Mobility proposal starts from both the Google SPDY protocol and the work the industry has done around WebSockets,” says Jean Paoli from the Microsoft Interoperability team. WebSockets in this case refers to a feature in HTML5 that allows websites (or indeed web apps) to open up bidirectional, real-time channels with remote servers over TCP, which is something that neither HTTP nor SPDY is capable of.

In short, the entire purpose of SPDY is to speed up the web — which isn’t a bad thing, and nor is it surprising, considering Google’s fanatical penchant for speed, but Microsoft is basically saying that speed isn’t everything. With HTTP Speed+Mobility, Microsoft is saying that we should also take into account factors such as battery life and bandwidth cost, both of which will play a big part in Windows 8 in specific and mobile computing in general.

Source: Extremetech

Not exactly new news but still worth watching.

Promising changes in IE9

Microsoft Internet Explorer 9 actually looks promising.

Welcome To A More Beautiful Web – Welcome To A More Beautiful Web – Internet Explorer 9

While the internet has kept up with every changing needs, however the way we experience hasn’t, until now! Welcome to a more beautiful web with Internet Explorer 9. Internet Explorer delivers a more beautiful Web by using the full capabilities of Windows and PC hardware so your Web sites and applications are as immersive as the native applications running on your PC.

Where to find Windows Live Messenger emoticons

This is the directory or folder where MSN or Windows Live Messenger custom emoticons are located:

For Windows XP:

C:Documents and Settings [Your user name] Local SettingsApplication DataMicrosoftMessenger [Your Live ID] ObjectStoreCustomEmoticons

For Windows Vista or Windows 7:

C:Users [Your user name] AppDataLocalMicrosoftMessenger [Your Live ID] CustomEmoticons

In my case (email removed), it is found in “C:Users kahwee AppData Local Microsoft Messenger something@example.com ObjectStore CustomEmoticons”.

For Mac OS X (Snow Leopard)’s Microsoft Messenger:

/Users/ [Your user name] /Documents/Microsoft User Data/Microsoft Messenger Data/ [Your Live ID] /ObjectStore/CustomEmoticons

In my case, it is found in “/Users /kahwee /Documents /Microsoft User Data /Microsoft Messenger Data /something@example.com /ObjectStore /CustomEmoticons”

You can backup your custom emoticons by copying the directory to your flash drive or something. As far as I know, you cannot transfer Mac OS X’s Microsoft Messenger custom emoticons to your Windows’ Live Messenger and vice versa.

Peter Molyneux demos Milo

Take a look at this video presentation where Peter Molyneux and his coworkers at Lionhead Studios made:

What is an even greater portent of things to come for RPGs and adventure games, is the fact that Peter Molyneux and his team at Lionhead Studios, an RPG-centric game studio, are the ones developing the Milo API in the first place. And if that was not awesome enough for you, consider this. At a recent private play thru of Milo, it was revealed to Joystiq, that Lionhead would indeed be including Milo in a real game to see release around the same time as the Project Natal launch. Still no official date on Project Natal’s release, however judging by the polished state of Milo, I’d say definitely sometime in the next 12 to 18 months. Putting it firmly sometime within the 2009 – 2010 calender years.

E3 2009 – Project Natal – Milo Demo with Peter Molyneux 720p HD

This technology supposedly is available in Xbox 360’s Xbox Kinect. I just haven’t seen something like this and the idea continues to fascinates me. Still, Lionhead Studios need to deliver the product, just a video demonstration means little.