My first impression of MacBook Pro and Mac OS X

This is the first time since a decade ago where I buy a computer with an OS fully installed. I almost have no recollection how easy this supposed to be. When I received my MacBook Pro earlier in the day I had thoughts on how I have to set things up.

It was delivered (finally) at half past 4. My brother and I opened the package which presents itself well and earned an excellent first impression. I switched on the MacBook Pro and was delighted it just works. (That’s not to say that others computers don’t.)

I begin by trying out all the eye-candy stuff, the dashboard, the expose and made sure I opened each and every application to see how it looks like. Then I played with the System Preferences, probably that excites the geek part of me.

Instead of getting Mac OS X to suit me, I decided not to do any custom settings and use all those System Preferences as default. I explored around like a kid with a new toy and felt Apple delivered the experience.

Then my frustration sets in. All the function keys require the ‘fn’ to be held down. I don’t mind if the controls that took over are useful, but it’s being replaced with crap like backward, forward, play buttons that is just unnecessary. There’s no Home button. And I still have no idea how to get the Num Pad out, or is there even one?

The first thing I installed was, well, Windows 7. Please don’t scream at me. It’s the nearest I could get to something familiar. Windows 7 works for a while and start giving my blue screens then black screens then no screens. I tried resurrected it by starting the recovery console where my brother and I stared at the damn forever-progressing progress bar left to right till we got dizzy. It didn’t fix itself. I switched off and went back to Mac OS X.

It’s destiny I tell you.

Some suggestions for .gitignore

This is more of a personal note. You may find it useful too.

Here’s how to ignore files and folders using Git. You can create a file “.gitignore” and place in the files and folders that you wish to ignore (separated with a line break).

In the file: “./.gitignore”

Here’s a list of standard things to do a .gitignore. It ignores the thumbnail files generated by Mac OSX and Windows. (I’m on Windows Vista.) You can place this on the top folder of your Git project:

[code lang=”ini”]nbproject
.DS_Store
Thumbs.db
Desktop.ini[/code]

“nbproject” is for NetBeans.

In the file: “./app/.gitignore”

Well, if you use CakePHP, you may want to add an additional .gitignore file in your CakePHP app directory:

[code lang=”ini”]tmp/**/*
config/database.php[/code]

I am open to suggestions what other files or folders are good to ignore but these are all I can recall. You can read more about gitignore at kernal.org.