Tag Archives: google

Google to shut down Wave

Google announces that Google Wave is to be no more, amongst reasons cited are that it hasn’t gain the traction Google has hoped for. This is hardly surprising for me, Google Wave is just too complex for most. It tries to be everything and failed to stand out.

Google Wave logo

(It’s time to wave goodbye.)

Update on Google Wave

Wave has not seen the user adoption we would have liked. We don’t plan to continue developing Wave as a standalone product, but we will maintain the site at least through the end of the year and extend the technology for use in other Google projects. The central parts of the code, as well as the protocols that have driven many of Wave’s innovations, like drag-and-drop and character-by-character live typing, are already available as open source, so customers and partners can continue the innovation we began. In addition, we will work on tools so that users can easily “liberate” their content from Wave.

Wave has taught us a lot, and we are proud of the team for the ways in which they have pushed the boundaries of computer science. We are excited about what they will develop next as we continue to create innovations with the potential to advance technology and the wider web. (Source: Google Blog)

RIP. And thank goodness I didn’t explore the Google Wave API much.

So this is Chrome OS

I saw the Install Chrome OS option on Parallels and thought I’ll just install and try it. There’s nothing much to do there actually. Most of Google custom domain apps aren’t working with Chrome OS. It requires you to be on the Google-owned domain.

Chrome OS screenshot

Here are some of the apps. If you click on the chess icon, it launches an Adobe Flash made chess game online. Those apps are just bookmarks to the online websites.

Google now does DNS resolving too

Google now does DNS resolving too. You can switch if you’re using OpenDNS.

Introducing Google Public DNS: A new DNS resolver from Google

Today, as part of our efforts to make the web faster, we are announcing Google Public DNS, a new experimental public DNS resolver.

The DNS protocol is an important part of the web’s infrastructure, serving as the Internet’s “phone book”. Every time you visit a website, your computer performs a DNS lookup. Complex pages often require multiple DNS lookups before they complete loading. As a result, the average Internet user performs hundreds of DNS lookups each day, that collectively can slow down his or her browsing experience.

  • Speed: Resolver-side cache misses are one of the primary contributors to sluggish DNS responses. Clever caching techniques can help increase the speed of these responses. Google Public DNS implements prefetching: before the TTL on a record expires, we refresh the record continuously, asychronously and independently of user requests for a large number of popular domains. This allows Google Public DNS to serve many DNS requests in the round trip time it takes a packet to travel to our servers and back.
  • Security: DNS is vulnerable to spoofing attacks that can poison the cache of a nameserver and can route all its users to a malicious website. Until new protocols like DNSSEC get widely adopted, resolvers need to take additional measures to keep their caches secure. Google Public DNS makes it more difficult for attackers to spoof valid responses by randomizing the case of query names and including additional data in its DNS messages.
  • Validity: Google Public DNS complies with the DNS standards and gives the user the exact response his or her computer expects without performing any blocking, filtering, or redirection that may hamper a user’s browsing experience.

(Source: Google)

Just use the following name servers:

nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 8.8.4.4

Nice numbers. They got those from Level 3.

In 1996, Larry Page made this post

This is posted in 1996:

From: Lawrence Page

I have a web robot which is a Java app. I need to be able to set the User-Agent field in the HTTP header in order to be a good net citizen (so people know who is accessing their server). Anyone have any ideas?

Right now, Java sends a request that includes something like:

User-Agent: Java/1.0beta2

I’d rather not rewrite all the HTTP stuff myself. I tried just searching in the JDK for the Java/1.0beta2 figuring I could just change the string, but I couldn’t find it. Perhaps it is stored as a unicode string?

An easy method of setting the User-Agent field should probably be added to Java, so people can properly identify their programs.

Thanks, Larry Page

A web robot? Guess what is it?

[via Guyro]