Why CSS buttons aren’t used enough

I know CSS buttons exists, are really faster and not enough sites are using it. Let me try to explain on the different point of views. I am a Web UI Developer in situated in Singapore. I do tons of frontend work.

UI Designer

They care the most on the look and feel of the button. They add shadows, a gradient and a beautiful texture. It’s the perfect button, in PNG. Well they send you in PNG, they design it in Photoshop. They most likely wouldn’t know CSS. They send you the button as part of a larger image to slice and implement. Their job is to make the UI look great, not to be concerned with speed of page rendering and assets delivery. They believe someone will take care of it.

Web UI Developer

Our interest is to finish up the task and make it look like the design. We could implement a button with CSS but we don’t know the shadow and border radius involved. We could ask the UI Designer but that takes an email and we might have to tone down the UI Designer’s button design. It’s a lot easier to deliver the button in an image format than to go through the hassle. We are slightly more concern with the speed but we don’t want to compromise on other’s work.

QA Engineer

This person is there to make sure that the Web UI Developer implements stuff correctly. That means the design of the button must look right in various browsers and platforms. The image format would look exactly like the mockup, it’s something QA Engineers would prefer. QA’s priority is to make sure the button is implemented as specified. Often speed of delivery is not in the specification.

DevOps Engineer

DevOps Engineer will look at the page and scan through and announce that image compression is needed to speed up the delivery of the webpage. He or she will then announced that after compression, the website is now 23% smaller and provide advice on compress images and CSS during the build process. The CSS button issue will fade away because everyone things compression is good enough a solution.

How to make it work better

The UI Developer probably has to step up and advice the changes being the interface between all parties. Perhaps they can be incentives towards better speed and performance. It’s a metrics that is not emphasized.

Amazon Web Services expands to Singapore

This isn’t exactly the latest news but — Amazon Web Services expands to Singapore. Expansion to Singapore would keep Singapore web hosting prices a lot more competitive. Amazon is bringing to Singapore:

  • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2),
  • Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3),
  • Amazon SimpleDB,
  • Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS),
  • Amazon Simple Queue Service (Amazon SQS),
  • Amazon Elastic MapReduce,
  • Amazon CloudFront.

Yes EC2 is coming to Singapore over the second half of 2010. I am considering migrating some stuff over to Amazon due to its pricing.

Amazon web services

Amazon Web Services Announces Expansion into Asia in the First Half of 2010

Amazon Web Services LLC, an Amazon.com company (NASDAQ:AMZN), today announced an expansion of its services into an Asia-Pacific region in the first half of 2010, enabling businesses to deploy compute and storage resources in close proximity to their end-users in the region. Software developers and businesses will be able to access AWS’s infrastructure services from multiple Availability Zones in Singapore in the first half of 2010, then in other Availability Zones within Asia over the second half of 2010. AWS services available at the launch of the Asia-Pacific region will include Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2), Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), Amazon SimpleDB, Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (Amazon SQS), Amazon Elastic MapReduce, and Amazon CloudFront. (Source: Amazon)

Amazon has yet to release the pricing for Singapore but I’m guessing it would cost about USD0.20 per hour. Hosting hasn’t been that cheap in Singapore currently. If they charge less than USD$0.14 per hour for a small Linux EC2 instance, I would start advocating people to switch. Currently in US, Amazon charges USD$0.085 per hour. VPS hosting in Singapore is still kinda expensive for whatever reasons. Running a website really shouldn’t be that costly.

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