John Cleese on creativity

John Marwood Cleese is an English actor, comedian, writer and film producer. He achieved success at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, and as a scriptwriter on The Frost Report. In the late 1960s he became a member of Monty Python, the comedy troupe responsible for the sketch show Monty Python’s Flying Circus and the four Monty Python films: And Now for Something Completely Different, Holy Grail, Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life.

JOHN CLEESE WCF

“The key to getting to a creative stage is to avoid interruption.”

Why did Blue Power Ranger leave?

David Yost explains why he left Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers at Anime Festival Orlando 2010:

I was called “f a g g o t” one too many times. So, um, I had just heard that several times while working on the show from creators, producers, writers, directors.

It’s not that people can’t talk about me and have their opinion about me, but continuing to work in an environment like that is really difficult, and I myself was struggling with who I was or what I was, and to be … made fun of on some level or to be stereotyped or put into a category in sort of saying ‘you’re not’ — basically, I just felt like I was continually being told that I’m not worthy of where I am because I’m a gay person and I’m not supposed to be an actor and you can’t be a superhero.

And I know that my costars were called in a couple of times to different producers’ offices and questioned about my sexuality, which is kind of a humiliating experience to hear that and to find that out.

So there was just a lot of issues; it just felt like a bad marriage. And I could either stay and do the second movie and finish six more months of the show or just — I don’t know, I guess I was kind of worried about my life. I was worried that I might take my own life. So in order for me to get a handle on what was going on, I needed to leave when I left. And so that’s sort of why I left the show. (via Perez Hilton and Geekosystem)

So that’s why…

Proving Fermat’s Last Theorem

Fermat’s last theorem is strikingly different and much more difficult to prove than the analogous problem for n = 2… The fact that the problem’s statement is understandable by schoolchildren makes it all the more frustrating, and it has probably generated more incorrect proofs than any other problem in the history of mathematics. No correct proof was found for 357 years, when a proof was finally published by Andrew Wiles in 1994. The term “last theorem” resulted because all the other theorems proposed by Fermat were eventually proved or disproved, either by his own proofs or by other mathematicians, in the two centuries following their proposition.”

Fermat claims to have proven it in his letter:

Cubum autem in duos cubos, aut quadratoquadratum in duos quadratoquadratos, et generaliter nullam in infinitum ultra quadratum potestatem in duos eiusdem nominis fas est dividere cuius rei demonstrationem mirabilem sane detexi. Hanc marginis exiguitas non caperet.

Translated:

I have discovered a truly marvelous proof that it is impossible to separate a cube into two cubes, or a fourth power into two fourth powers, or in general, any power higher than the second into two like powers. This margin is too narrow to contain it.

Right. Andrew Wiles has successfully proven the last theorem with techniques not made available to Fermat during his time. Fermat’s proof probably never existed.

Fermat’s Last Theorem Part 1

Continue reading “Proving Fermat’s Last Theorem”

Watch Bill Gates release mosquitoes to TED audience

Bill Gates talks about malaria and he says, “I brought some here so you can experience this and we’ll let those roam around the auditorium a little bit. There’s no reason only poor people should have this experience.” He then proceed to opening a jar of mosquito slightly and letting some mosquitoes out! You can see it somewhere at 5:10 of the video. The TED organizers quickly responded confirming the mosquitoes are malaria-free. Bill Gates hopes to solve some of the world’s biggest problems using a new kind of philanthropy. In a passionate and, yes, funny 18 minutes, he asks us to consider two big questions and how we might answer them.

Bill Gates: How I’m trying to change the world now

It’s a good speech. But what a badass! Haha!

Strange Chinese names

I always knew some celebrities have the strangest names. These two are choices for food: Fruit Chan and Noodle Cheng.

Fruit Chan

Fruit Chan Gor (traditional Chinese: 陳果) is an independent Hong Kong screenwriter, film director and producer, who is best known for his style of film reflecting the everyday life of Hong Kong people.

Fruit Chan and Bai Ling

(Fruit Chan and Bai Ling. Image from ViewImages.)

Noodle Cheng

Ekin Cheng Yee-Kin is a Hong Kong actor and Cantopop singer. Earlier in his career he was known as Noodle Cheng, though he has now reverted to a more conventional-sounding first name. Sometimes he uses Dior (because that was what it sounded like when his younger sister tried to call him) as a first name but usually Ekin is the name used.

Lost: The Musical (Parody)

Lost The Musical is a Lost parody skit presented by Jimmy Kimmel Live! on January 13th 2006, mocking both LOST and the perceived tendency to capitalize on the success of any phenomenon by transforming it into a musical. Also, Evangeline Lilly was a guest on that episode.

Recently I’ve been into Lost. I said it was crap back then but now I have to eat my words. I am liking it. Pity I reached the finale of Lost season 4 already and have to wait till coming February 2009 for Lost season 5.

The central theme of Lost is more than a bunch of folks trying to survive a plane crash. The island itself has some special properties, sloowly slooowly revealed as time goes by. J.J. Abrams, one of the creators of this hit series, is also responsible for Cloverfield. Lost comes with alternate reality games, jigsaw puzzles and web sites. That won many fan. (Citation not need.)