Be humble

The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History. The new film, created by the Museum, is part of an exhibition, Visions of the Cosmos: From the Milky Ocean to an Evolving Universe, at the Rubin Museum of Art in Manhattan through May 2010.

Could our world be merely a projection?

Honestly, I’m really in the midst of the article. Understanding physics is almost impossible to me. The article talks about reality being just images which is an idea I came across not in the science way but more of some random thought. I had this idea that perhaps no one but me – yes it’s sad – exist and everything around me is simply my imagination. It’s a scary thought and it made me rather upset the time I thought about it. Anyway, before I digress too far – A German detector is picking up a hint that we are all mere projections. And the article:

Our world may be a giant hologram

If this doesn’t blow your socks off, then Hogan, who has just been appointed director of Fermilab’s Center for Particle Astrophysics, has an even bigger shock in store: “If the GEO600 result is what I suspect it is, then we are all living in a giant cosmic hologram.”

The idea that we live in a hologram probably sounds absurd, but it is a natural extension of our best understanding of black holes, and something with a pretty firm theoretical footing. It has also been surprisingly helpful for physicists wrestling with theories of how the universe works at its most fundamental level.

The “holographic principle” challenges our sensibilities. It seems hard to believe that you woke up, brushed your teeth and are reading this article because of something happening on the boundary of the universe. No one knows what it would mean for us if we really do live in a hologram, yet theorists have good reasons to believe that many aspects of the holographic principle are true. (Source: New Scientist)

How would you feel in a black hole

Neil deGrasse Tyson explains how you would (possibly) die in a black hole. Well described and funny. Cosmic yoga. Neil deGrasse Tyson talks about being pulled apart in the black hole.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson: Death by Black Hole

Neil deGrasse Tyson (born October 5, 1958 in New York City) is an astrophysicist and, since 1996, the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Since 2006, he has hosted PBS’s educational television show NOVA scienceNOW. Tyson is also known for his multiple appearances on The Colbert Report. (from Wikipedia)

Whether discussing the universe’s origins as host of NOVA’s “scienceNOW” or asserting that Pluto is a not a planet on “The Colbert Report,” astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson translates the universe’s complexities for a broad audience.

Known as the great explainer of all things cosmic, Tyson first became known in the astronomy community by lecturing on the subject at the age of fifteen. He is currently the director of New York’s Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, where he also teaches. Tyson has written seven popular books including the bestselling Death by Black Hole and the memoir The Sky Is Not The Limit.