Men love shopping online

BusinessWeek reports that men love their shopping as much as women but the departmental stores are women-focus. Men would pay for convenience in their shopping more.

Men who have had to live with department stores designed primarily for women are flocking to websites such as Bonobos and Thrillist that push convenience and a fast shopping experience.

“Men don’t hate fashion, they just hate shopping the way it’s designed for women,” said Ben Lerer, founder of Thrillist, which gives men tips for activities or products and then sells them. “The young generation of guys love to shop, they love to talk about the brands they like and they really care about how they look.”

While women’s share of the online clothing market is still more than double men’s, the men’s market is growing faster, at a 13 percent annual rate compared with 10 percent for women, according to NPD Group, a consumer tracking service.

The market for clothing and accessories is expected to grow 78 percent to $73 billion by 2016, according to EMarketer. That’s faster than categories like electronics or music.

In Singapore there is still a lack of men-focused online stores. A couple of names come up to my mind when it comes to online fashion — ASOS and Zalora. Both ships to Singapore and are popular among online shoppers. Is there any men-focused online stores I have missed? If you have plans to start one, do tell me about it. Hint: I’m a senior software engineer and web developer.

Recounting 2011

New year’s coming and I am excited that I am going older a year. This year has been particularly fruitful. I completed most of what I set to achieve. Here’s a rough status:

  • On religion, I ascertain my religious stance. I am neither theist nor atheist. I found out about the word “ignostic” (or theological noncognitivism) and felt it describes the thoughts that are forming from 2008 to now and I learn that I am not alone.
  • On consumption, I have deeper appreciation on the finer things. I learnt to enjoy coffee in its bitter form. I finally got it.
  • On living, I am slowly discovering what my motto in life is. It’s kind of flaky and I should not discuss it now. I feel a lot of decisions that I make or do not make is based on this narrative. While it differs from most people, I found peace in that statement and that everything will be okay if I continue to invest my options towards that goal.
  • On work, I quit ONG&ONG because I got too comfortable. I never realized I crave for uncertainty that much. I traded stability for excitement. It’s the first step to reprioritize myself. I look forward to 2012.
  • On clothes, I am more willing to try out something less conservative. I wanted to believe that there is a perfect form of fashion but this is perhaps fundamentally incorrect. I am confident that nearly no one has any idea if a set of apparel and accessories is matching. It depends on the person having the confidence to pull off the most ridiculous of combinations.
  • On verbal and written communication, I could do better. I should work on this more in 2012. I tend to be misunderstood.
  • On health, I am less healthy than before. I will go to the gym more. Oh and by the way, I somewhat concluded that the most important thing in life cannot be health. Anyway who claims that haven’t thought through the subject sufficiently. If you believe in that and you aren’t a health product salesman please let me pull you out of this disillusion. Call me.
  • On music, I like fusion jazz and electro swing more. And Nicki Minaj of course. I got a pair of Marshall headphones this year and it is best investment this year. Thank you Joanne.
  • On people, I grew less skeptic and less protective of myself this year. Am I just waiting to be hurt really badly? Maybe. People are kinder to me this year — empirical evidence of something done right.

See you next year.

Cheating clothes waist line

From New Yorker:

A recent article in Esquire reports that many trousers are significantly more ample than the marked waist size. This is due to “vanity sizing.” The magazine collected a batch of pants by different manufacturers, all marked as having a thirty-six-inch waist. At H&M, they were actually thirty-seven inches; at Calvin Klein, thirty-eight and a half; at the Gap, thirty-nine; at Dockers, thirty-nine and a half; and, at Old Navy, forty-one.

This clears up my suspicion! Doesn’t this make online shopping a lot harder?